Exorcist Stairs

The Exorcist Stairs

Knowing a stop at the stairs in the Georgetown section of Washington DC would be one many of the distractions that would be encountered on my road trip to Vermont, it was only fitting to watch the movie again before heading out. My wife hates scary movies and I didn’t think it was right to put my seven year old through the trauma of watching one of the movies declared to be one of the scariest movies of all time, just so she could understand why daddy wanted to walk down a specific set of random stairs. Technically my Bucket List entry does say to Fall Down the Exorcist Stairs in Georgetown, but having gotten a bit older since adding it to my Bucket List it seems like a better idea to simply walk down them.

Exorcist Stairs Plaque

I was fairly surprised how difficult it was to even watch the movie, I don’t mean it was actually hard to watch but finding a spot to get the film proved to be somewhat problematic. You see I have become spoiled by the fact that we have countless sources for free on-demand movies in our house, that I don’t think I have paid to watch a movie in my living room for a very long time. Not counting of course the money we spend on all the different streaming services and our overpriced cable from Time Warner. I struck out with all our services for a free viewing of the 1973 horror classic, but finally managed to find a copy for basically free from Amazon Prime Video. At $3.99 for the rental with a 75% digital rental voucher code (MOVIE75OFF), and a $1.00 off credit from not taking advantage if two day shipping on Amazon Prime Orders, I finally managed to watch my late night horror movie for only $0.25! To save you the trouble of tracking it down here is a link to it!

For my younger readers who have never seen the Exorcist, it really is one of those must see movies. Entertainment Weekly, Time Out, and Movies.com have all called it the best Horror Movie of all time, and authors like Stephen King have even stated it as an inspiration to there work. The US Library of Congress has even added it to the National Film Registery, as distinction limited to only 25 films per year. The horrors of this film are not just those found on the screen while watching the film, but even during production the film was said to be cursed, with countless members of the film team coming down with illness’s and injuries.  An interesting fact about the movie though is during production of the film, the intent was not to make a horror film at all but a physiological thriller. A thriller is exactly what I see it as, because horror films in my book normally involve a summer camp and some shankly dressed girl running upstairs instead of our the front door when some durranged guy with a chainsaw is running around the house.

Now I’ll be the first to admit it may not be as action packed or have the amazing special effects that are found in the movies of today; but even without that it still ranks up there as one of my all time favorite movies! The movie is significant enough that it warranted an entry on my bucket list to, fall down the stairs featured in the film. Long and the short for the mellinials reading, if you haven’t seen the movie yet stop reading this post now and go watch the movie. I’m calling out the mellinials here, because I can’t imagine that anyone born before 1990 hasn’t already seen the movie countless times. If you have seen the movie and understand the significances on modern culture then you’ll understand the desire to visit the landmark location that is the Exorcist Steps in the Georgetown section of Washington DC.

For those who still enjoy reading a good book, might I suggest picking up a copy of William Peter Blatty’s original novel, that the film is based off of. The film may be a classic horror flick, but like almost all movies based off a book, no matter how good the film may be it just doesn’t do justic to the wonders of the written word. There is nothing as scary as what the human mind can produce while reading a book in an empty house by a warm fire.

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